On Mindfulness, Part Two

In last month’s blog post, we looked at the difference between simply purchasing mindfulness, and thus, making a shallow attempt to incorporate it into our daily lives, and, on the flipside, authentically implementing mindfulness practices into our lives and essences. The former serves only to make us feel more disintegrated, while the latter has potential to provide deeper levels of mind, body, and soul cohesion. As promised, below is a guide to a mindfulness practice that I introduce to patients in therapy. 

Read More
Emily Ewing
On Mindfulness, Part One

Do we, as consumers, see mindfulness as a quick fix, slapping its label onto our outward selves to make us feel more connected? Do we approach ten minutes of meditation simply to check it off our to-do lists? Have we purchased every book or read every article on mindfulness to become experts without being truly affected by the practice? Using mindfulness in this way cheapens the practice and, ironically, only serves to make us feel more disintegrated. It’s not enough to simply purchase mindfulness. We have to authentically practice it too.

Read More
Emily Ewing
Within the Journey

What if, rather than entering the therapeutic setting as consumers seeking a quick fix, we enter open to a different process, and thus, a different expectation as to what we will receive? What if we can begin to find peace within the great mysteries surrounding us—that we simply don’t have the answers to many of the questions we ask—and instead of despair, we come to find wonder, discovery, and joy in the process of unknowing? 

Read More